• header-phone

    Call Us Now
    +91-9873295566

  • header-timer

    Opening Hours
    Mon - Sat 10.00 - 7.00

Softner Plant

Softner Plant

50-TPH-Large-Scale-Industrial-Water-Softener

56-16MB-48B-2

CationExchCartoon

FH00DJA_WATERS

Softner Diagram

Methods[edit]

The most common means for removing water hardness rely on ion-exchange resin or reverse osmosis. Other approaches include precipitation methods and sequestration by the addition of chelating agents.

Ion-exchange resin devices[edit]

Conventional water-softening appliances intended for household use depend on an ion-exchange resin in which "hardness ions"—mainly Ca2+ and Mg2+—are exchanged for sodium ions.[6] As described by NSF/ANSI Standard 44,[7] ion-exchange devices reduce the hardness by replacing magnesium and calcium (Mg2+ and Ca2+) with sodium or potassium ions (Na+ and K+)."

Ion exchange resins, in the form of beads, are a functional component of domestic water softening units.

Ion exchange resins are organic polymers containing anionic functional groups to which the divalent cations (Ca++) bind more strongly than monovalent cations (Na+). Inorganic materials called zeolites also exhibit ion-exchange properties. These minerals are widely used in laundry detergents. Resins are also available to remove carbonate, bi-carbonate and sulfate ions which are absorbed and hydroxide ions released from the resin.[citation needed]

When all the available Na+ ions have been replaced with calcium or magnesium ions, the resin must be re-charged by eluting the Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions using a solution of sodium chloride or sodium hydroxide depending on the type of resin used.[8] For anionic resins, regeneration typically uses a solution of sodium hydroxide (lye) or potassium hydroxide. The waste waters eluted from the ion-exchange column containing the unwanted calcium and magnesium salts are typically discharged to the sewage system.